How to Temporarily Share Your Location with Someone Using Google Maps

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How to Temporarily Share Your Location with Someone Using Google Maps

By Justin Pot on April 21st, 2017

You’re meeting a friend downtown in a new city, and he asks you where you are. Be honest: you have no clue. Luckily, Google Maps can help you both out.

This relatively new feature shows your location right on your friend’s map—and his on yours—even if you’re both moving around. And if you’ve got Google Maps open, it’s easy to start sharing your location, assuming the person you want to share locations with is also a Google Maps user.

You know that blue dot that shows you where you are?

Tap that blue dot and you’ll see a bunch of options, including sharing your location.

You can choose how long to share your location—the default is one hour.

Once you decide how long to share your location, you can then choose specific contacts to share your location with using the “Select People” button. You can scroll through your contacts and choose someone to share with. The list will be populated with Google users in your contacts list. If the person you want to share your location with is not on the list, you can also send a link via SMS or any messaging app.

The person you share your location with will get a notification.

When they click through, they will see your location on their map.

The other user will also have the option to share their location with you, making it much easier for you to find each other. It’s like Harry Potter’s Marauder’s Map in real life.

Well…almost. In our tests, updates didn’t come in real time, at least not if the other person isn’t actively using Maps. But even then, updates are frequent enough that you’ll see occasional updates, giving you more of an idea of how close you are to each other. It’s a simple feature, but one that can solve a pretty common problem. You just have to remember it exists the next time you’re trying to meet up with someone!

Justin Pot is a staff writer for How-To Geek, and a technology enthusiast who lives in Hillsboro, Oregon. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook, if you want. You don’t have to.

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Call of Duty is officially heading back to WWII – The Verge

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Call of Duty is officially heading back to WWII – The Verge

The next Call of Duty is going back to World War II. As was rumored last month, the military shooter series is following up last year’s far future entry Infinite Warfare with a new title set during the second world war, the same setting as the first three games in the series. Call of Duty: WWII is being developed by Sledgehammer Games, the Call of Duty-focused studio behind 2011’s Modern Warfare 3 and 2014’s Advanced Warfare.

The shift back in time appears to be a response to the sci-fi setting of the most recent game in the series. “Infinite Warfare had a ton of great gameplay innovations,” Activision CEO Eric Hirshberg said during an earnings call in February. “But it also had a setting that didn’t appeal to all of our fans.”

As of now, however, there isn’t much detail on the next Call of Duty. Aside from the name and developer, Activision hasn’t revealed anything about the shooter. Expect that to change soon, though: the game will be officially unveiled in a livestream on April 26th at 1PM ET / 10AM PT.


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Microsoft has a plan to beat Chromebooks at their own game

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Microsoft has a plan to beat Chromebooks at their own game

Assuming this chart is accurate, it gives us a good idea of what sort of hardware we’ll be seeing from Windows 10 Cloud devices. The relatively modest specs include 4GB of RAM, a quad-core Celeron (or better) processor and either 32GB or 64GB of storage — that all sounds a lot like you’ll find in a Chromebook. Microsoft is looking to achieve “all-day” battery life for “most students” and super-short boot and wake from sleep times, as well.

What we’ve seen from Windows 10 Cloud suggests that machines running this new software will only work with Universal Windows Platform apps you get from the Microsoft Store — traditional Windows software will be out. But for a lot of students, that plus the many web-based apps and services out there will be enough to get a lot of work done. In any event, it looks like we’ll know more in less than two weeks, and we’ll be at Microsoft’s event to cover all the news.

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Duolingo now offers paid subscriptions for ad-free and offline access – The Verge

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Duolingo now offers paid subscriptions for ad-free and offline access – The Verge

Language learning app Duolingo this week introduced a paid subscription program for Android users, reports TechCrunch. Duolingo Plus will cost $9.99 a month and offers users ad-free lessons and offline access. The free, ad-supported version of the app will remain available.

“Subscribers will help keep language education free for millions of people around the world,” Duolingo CEO Luis von Ahn wrote in a blog post. “Being able to download lessons is particularly appealing to those learning a new language for travel purposes who want to practice while flying or without a stable Wi-Fi connection.”

The paid subscription comes after Duolingo’s dabble in various ways in monetize, from ads to certification courses to A/B testing in-app payments like charging $4.99 to repair a streak record.

von Ahn helped launched Duolingo with the goal of making language learning free and more accessible. In its early stages, the company launched a program to help crowdsource translations for the web, with plans to sell commissioned work to support the free service. According to TechCrunch, this program is still in beta.

Duolingo Plus will launch to select Android users at first; iOS support will be coming “soon.”


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Lilium’s electric personal jet manages a vertical takeoff

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Lilium’s electric personal jet manages a vertical takeoff

While the company plans to conduct manned flights in the future, the first series of tests remotely controlled a two-seater prototype from the ground. Its ultimate goal, however, is to release a five-seater version that can fit whole families and groups of friends. What gives the Lilium potential to become a great personal jet (or flying car, if you prefer to call it that) is that it doesn’t need a runway. It can take off and land like a helicopter from your (large) backyard, even if it’s within the city.

The vehicle also promises a range of 186 miles and speeds up to 186 mph, enough to take you from Manhattan to the JFK airport within five minutes. The German startup isn’t quite ready to take pre-orders for the Lilium yet, since its five-seater variant will have to go through years and years of testing. Still, its successful test flights and backing from the European Space Agency give us hope that a production version will eventually make its way to market.

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Update pushed out to U.S. Samsung Galaxy S8 improves performance of the phone’s features

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Update pushed out to U.S. Samsung Galaxy S8 improves performance of the phone’s features

One of our loyal Phone Arena readers has just received an update for his

Samsung Galaxy S8

. As you can see from the screenshot that accompanies this story, the size of the update weighs in at 392.14MB. When the notification arrives on your Galaxy S8 announcing the arrival of the new files, make sure that you are on a Wi-Fi network before starting the updating process. Before installing the update, you should also make sure that the battery on the device is fully charged.

According to the changelist, the update will include:

  • Improved performance for face recognition.
  • The camera’s UI has been adjusted.
  • The security of the device has been improved.
  • Device stability improvement and bug fixes.
  • New and enhanced features.
  • Further improvements to performance.

Because the phone cannot be employed while the update is being installed, Galaxy S8 users have the option of installing the update later or overnight. If the phone’s owner is expecting an important call and disabling the calling feature for 15-30 minutes is not feasible, one of those two choices can be selected.

Thanks for sending this in!



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Scientists Are Running for Office to Bring Facts Back to Washington

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Scientists Are Running for Office to Bring Facts Back to Washington

Scientists at a rally at the American Geophysical Union conference in December, 2016. Image: AP

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The first time Philip Stoddard, a professor of biology at Florida International University, ran for mayor of South Miami, he admits had no idea what he was doing.

“My neighbors tricked me into it,” Stoddard, a thin man with graying hair and a matter-of-fact way of speaking, told Gizmodo. “I was invited over to someone’s house to find out who the candidate would be, to run against the ten year incumbent. And I discovered it was me.”

“I had no idea how to run a campaign,” he added.

But Stoddard discovered that what he lacked in political experience he made up for in other ways. He studied hard and was quick to master new skills. Years of teaching college kids helped him to break down complex topics for lay audiences, and build stories out of disparate information. Most of all, he impressed would-be voters with his dogged, almost naive, commitment to facts.

“I told people, look, I’m not giving up my career as a scientist. If I don’t maintain a reputation for honesty, I’ll have no career.”

Stoddard’s message clicked. He won his first mayoral election in 2010, and has won three re-elections since. Yesterday, in a packed lecture hall at American University’s law school, Stoddard, along with several other scientists-turned-politicians, took the floor to offer fresh-off-the-lab-bench political candidates nuggets of wisdom. Other panelists at the candidate training event, which was organized by the nonprofit 314 Action, included Nadeem Mazen, a city councilman in Cambridge, Massachusetts with a degree in engineering from MIT, and Shaughnessy Naughton, a cancer biologist who ran for Congress twice in Pennsylvania’s 8th District, but lost both times in the primary election.

Panelists MarthaMcKenna, Nadeem Mazen, Philip Stoddard and Shaughnessy Naughton share advice for scientists interested in running for political office at a recent 314 Action event. Image: Maddie Stone

“We have a serious lack of people at all levels of government with a scientific background,” Naughton, who founded 314 Action last summer to help scientists launch political campaigns, told the audience. “Thankfully, running for office is a lot easier than getting your PhD,” she added, drawing laughter from the room.

Three months into Trump’s presidency, under an administration with little regard for scientists and even less for their conclusions, the American scientific community is in the midst of a political re-awakening. Thousands of scientists are standing up for evidence-based reasoning, by organizing protests, signing open letters to the White House, engaging in guerrilla data archiving events, and preparing to march on Washington this weekend, or to join one of the March for Science’s roughly 500 satellite events around the world.

More and more scientists are also launching campaigns for political office, from local city council seats and mayoral elections to congressional seats in the House and Senate. 314 Action’s recent candidate training event included panel discussions offering advice to first-time candidates, training sessions on how to craft a message and build a volunteer network, and fundraising strategies.

Nadeem Mazen, a city council member in Cambridge, Massachusetts with an engineering degree from MIT. Image:
VoteNadeem.com 

Despite the widespread conviction that science faces an existential threat under Trump, the event struck an optimistic tone overall. (Except, perhaps, for the keynote reception, in which former Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change chair Sir Robert Watson reminded the audience that the Paris climate agreement is “totally and utterly inaccurate,” and that really, human civilization is probably screwed.) One of ideas reiterated over and over by candidates and organizers alike was the unique skill set a scientist brings to the political table, whether she’s analyzing a dataset to understand demographic trends or using that famed objective reasoning to reach an evidence-based policy decision.

“One of the first things I say to people is that scientists must solve problems by knowing all of the information that’s possibly relevant,” Elaine DiMasi, a physicist at Brook Haven National Laboratory on Long Island who is considering a run for New York’s 1st district, told Gizmodo. “We will fail in our mission if we make an ideological decision to throw away half of what we know.”

Kathryn Allen, a physician running for Jason Chaffetz’s recently-opened House seat in Utah’s 3rd District in 2018, voiced a similar sentiment. “I think that people of science can help guide us back to a discussion of how to solve problems based on actual data instead of ideology,” she said. “I want to bring science back into the picture. I want reality to be fact-based instead of speculative.”

As an example of how technical skills can be brought to bear on policy, Stoddard shared a series of heat maps he had produced depicting tax yields on different parcels of land throughout South Miami—where revenue is generated, and where it goes. “As a zoologist, I know how important a good visualization is,” he said, noting the maps can be used to pinpoint exactly where to build, say, a transit station, and what to zone around it to maximize the city’s income while keeping residents happy. “This has been extraordinarily useful to the city.”

Dennis Dinge, an astrophysics PhD who is considering a run for New Mexico’s 1st district, also hopes to apply problem-solving skills to more down-to-Earth issues, like job growth. He’s a progressive who, like Bernie Sanders, thinks the cost of a college education is prohibitively high. But instead campaigning on the platform that college should be free for all, Dinge wants states to look at the data on what types of skilled workers are most needed where, and make specific majors tuition-free accordingly. A person unable to afford full-time tuition, or unable to go to college for free and miss out on years worth of income, might choose to get an education if a job was guaranteed at the end of the road.

Dinge admits that such a system would be an experiment. “That’s what scientists do,” he said. “I don’t think that’s what politicians are doing.”

There are plenty of reasons we don’t have more scientists occupying political office already—despite all the eager candidates who showed up for 314 Action’s training event, there remains just one science PhD in Congress. Some scientists aren’t comfortable in the public spotlight; others are simply too engrossed in their research to entertain a career switch. Some are concerned about diluting their credibility as scientists by jumping into the political fray.

Representative Bill Foster is the lone physicist in Congress today. Image: Bill Foster/Flickr

But for many, the barrier is a lack of familiarity with how to run a campaign that requires tight messaging, intense fundraising, and thousands of eager volunteers, which is where organizations like 314 Action hope to make a difference. Naughton has been floored by the response she’s seen from the scientific community since Trump’s election—so far, roughly 5,000 scientists have reached out to 314 Action about launching a political campaign.

“The attacks on science didn’t start with Trump,” she said. “But it has been a catalyst for a lot of folks.”

Aside from holding training workshops, 314 Action is now offering direct assistance to scientists running for congressional seats. Notably, while public training sessions are open to folks of all political affiliations, the organization is only financially supporting Democratic candidates—at least for now.

“The obvious reason is if you look at the two party’s platforms, where the Republican party is on climate change is just unacceptable,” she said.

It’s possible this party preference will be loosened as the organization pivots toward more state and local elections, where it is often said that partisan gridlock is less intense. In Mazen’s view, “local and state level is where folks will make the most impact. That’s where we’ve seen success,” he said. Stoddard noted that one of his closest allies on tackling the impacts of climate change—which is already a huge issue for South Florida—has been the former Republican mayor of Coral Gables, Jim Cason.

But overall, party affiliation came up surprisingly little among the candidates I spoke with yesterday. Most of the scientists just wanted to talk about how they couldn’t wait to solve new problems. “Do experiments,” Stoddard urged a room full of bright-eyed candidates. “Use data. Remember that you’re a teacher already.”

Those encouraging words, however, were tempered by a note of caution from Sir Watson: “You have to be able to tell powerful individuals they are wrong.”


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Scientists Are Running for Office to Bring Facts Back to Washington

gizmodo.com/scientists-ar… report error

Scientists Are Running for Office to Bring Facts Back to Washington

Scientists at a rally at the American Geophysical Union conference in December, 2016. Image: AP

WASHINGTON, D.C.—The first time Philip Stoddard, a professor of biology at Florida International University, ran for mayor of South Miami, he admits had no idea what he was doing.

“My neighbors tricked me into it,” Stoddard, a thin man with graying hair and a matter-of-fact way of speaking, told Gizmodo. “I was invited over to someone’s house to find out who the candidate would be, to run against the ten year incumbent. And I discovered it was me.”

“I had no idea how to run a campaign,” he added.

But Stoddard discovered that what he lacked in political experience he made up for in other ways. He studied hard and was quick to master new skills. Years of teaching college kids helped him to break down complex topics for lay audiences, and build stories out of disparate information. Most of all, he impressed would-be voters with his dogged, almost naive, commitment to facts.

“I told people, look, I’m not giving up my career as a scientist. If I don’t maintain a reputation for honesty, I’ll have no career.”

Stoddard’s message clicked. He won his first mayoral election in 2010, and has won three re-elections since. Yesterday, in a packed lecture hall at American University’s law school, Stoddard, along with several other scientists-turned-politicians, took the floor to offer fresh-off-the-lab-bench political candidates nuggets of wisdom. Other panelists at the candidate training event, which was organized by the nonprofit 314 Action, included Nadeem Mazen, a city councilman in Cambridge, Massachusetts with a degree in engineering from MIT, and Shaughnessy Naughton, a cancer biologist who ran for Congress twice in Pennsylvania’s 8th District, but lost both times in the primary election.

Panelists MarthaMcKenna, Nadeem Mazen, Philip Stoddard and Shaughnessy Naughton share advice for scientists interested in running for political office at a recent 314 Action event. Image: Maddie Stone

“We have a serious lack of people at all levels of government with a scientific background,” Naughton, who founded 314 Action last summer to help scientists launch political campaigns, told the audience. “Thankfully, running for office is a lot easier than getting your PhD,” she added, drawing laughter from the room.

Three months into Trump’s presidency, under an administration with little regard for scientists and even less for their conclusions, the American scientific community is in the midst of a political re-awakening. Thousands of scientists are standing up for evidence-based reasoning, by organizing protests, signing open letters to the White House, engaging in guerrilla data archiving events, and preparing to march on Washington this weekend, or to join one of the March for Science’s roughly 500 satellite events around the world.

More and more scientists are also launching campaigns for political office, from local city council seats and mayoral elections to congressional seats in the House and Senate. 314 Action’s recent candidate training event included panel discussions offering advice to first-time candidates, training sessions on how to craft a message and build a volunteer network, and fundraising strategies.

Nadeem Mazen, a city council member in Cambridge, Massachusetts with an engineering degree from MIT. Image:
VoteNadeem.com 

Despite the widespread conviction that science faces an existential threat under Trump, the event struck an optimistic tone overall. (Except, perhaps, for the keynote reception, in which former Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change chair Sir Robert Watson reminded the audience that the Paris climate agreement is “totally and utterly inaccurate,” and that really, human civilization is probably screwed.) One of ideas reiterated over and over by candidates and organizers alike was the unique skill set a scientist brings to the political table, whether she’s analyzing a dataset to understand demographic trends or using that famed objective reasoning to reach an evidence-based policy decision.

“One of the first things I say to people is that scientists must solve problems by knowing all of the information that’s possibly relevant,” Elaine DiMasi, a physicist at Brook Haven National Laboratory on Long Island who is considering a run for New York’s 1st district, told Gizmodo. “We will fail in our mission if we make an ideological decision to throw away half of what we know.”

Kathryn Allen, a physician running for Jason Chaffetz’s recently-opened House seat in Utah’s 3rd District in 2018, voiced a similar sentiment. “I think that people of science can help guide us back to a discussion of how to solve problems based on actual data instead of ideology,” she said. “I want to bring science back into the picture. I want reality to be fact-based instead of speculative.”

As an example of how technical skills can be brought to bear on policy, Stoddard shared a series of heat maps he had produced depicting tax yields on different parcels of land throughout South Miami—where revenue is generated, and where it goes. “As a zoologist, I know how important a good visualization is,” he said, noting the maps can be used to pinpoint exactly where to build, say, a transit station, and what to zone around it to maximize the city’s income while keeping residents happy. “This has been extraordinarily useful to the city.”

Dennis Dinge, an astrophysics PhD who is considering a run for New Mexico’s 1st district, also hopes to apply problem-solving skills to more down-to-Earth issues, like job growth. He’s a progressive who, like Bernie Sanders, thinks the cost of a college education is prohibitively high. But instead campaigning on the platform that college should be free for all, Dinge wants states to look at the data on what types of skilled workers are most needed where, and make specific majors tuition-free accordingly. A person unable to afford full-time tuition, or unable to go to college for free and miss out on years worth of income, might choose to get an education if a job was guaranteed at the end of the road.

Dinge admits that such a system would be an experiment. “That’s what scientists do,” he said. “I don’t think that’s what politicians are doing.”

There are plenty of reasons we don’t have more scientists occupying political office already—despite all the eager candidates who showed up for 314 Action’s training event, there remains just one science PhD in Congress. Some scientists aren’t comfortable in the public spotlight; others are simply too engrossed in their research to entertain a career switch. Some are concerned about diluting their credibility as scientists by jumping into the political fray.

Representative Bill Foster is the lone physicist in Congress today. Image: Bill Foster/Flickr

But for many, the barrier is a lack of familiarity with how to run a campaign that requires tight messaging, intense fundraising, and thousands of eager volunteers, which is where organizations like 314 Action hope to make a difference. Naughton has been floored by the response she’s seen from the scientific community since Trump’s election—so far, roughly 5,000 scientists have reached out to 314 Action about launching a political campaign.

“The attacks on science didn’t start with Trump,” she said. “But it has been a catalyst for a lot of folks.”

Aside from holding training workshops, 314 Action is now offering direct assistance to scientists running for congressional seats. Notably, while public training sessions are open to folks of all political affiliations, the organization is only financially supporting Democratic candidates—at least for now.

“The obvious reason is if you look at the two party’s platforms, where the Republican party is on climate change is just unacceptable,” she said.

It’s possible this party preference will be loosened as the organization pivots toward more state and local elections, where it is often said that partisan gridlock is less intense. In Mazen’s view, “local and state level is where folks will make the most impact. That’s where we’ve seen success,” he said. Stoddard noted that one of his closest allies on tackling the impacts of climate change—which is already a huge issue for South Florida—has been the former Republican mayor of Coral Gables, Jim Cason.

But overall, party affiliation came up surprisingly little among the candidates I spoke with yesterday. Most of the scientists just wanted to talk about how they couldn’t wait to solve new problems. “Do experiments,” Stoddard urged a room full of bright-eyed candidates. “Use data. Remember that you’re a teacher already.”

Those encouraging words, however, were tempered by a note of caution from Sir Watson: “You have to be able to tell powerful individuals they are wrong.”


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The best laser printer

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The best laser printer

www.engadget.com/2017/04…

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The best laser printer

Who should get this

If you print less than once a week on average, or mostly print text-first documents—like school assignments, invoices, shipping labels, tax forms, real estate applications, personal records, permission slips, tickets—a mono laser printer is probably all you need. Assuming, that is, you really need a printer at all.

Compared with inkjet printers, laser printers cost more to buy, but less to own over time because the toner is so cheap. Lasers won’t cause as much stress as inkjets, either, because they never clog, and their large toner cartridges can print at least twice as many pages as a typical ink cartridge before they need to be replaced. Laser printers also tend to be faster than inkjets, and they usually produce sharper-looking text as well.

So who shouldn’t get a laser printer? If you don’t have a lot of money to spend but need to print in color, an inkjet printer is the only way to go. Inkjets are also the only (relatively) affordable way to print glossy, high-quality photos at home. And a decent inkjet that can scan, copy, and print in color costs much less than a color laser machine with the same features. We recommend some decent inkjet machines here.

How we picked and tested

Two of our finalists, the Samsung Xpress SL-M2835DW (left) and Brother HL-L2360DW (right). Photo: Liam McCabe

Based on the best-seller lists at major retailers, most people want a printer that’s affordable, with a low cost per page and minimal maintenance—a simple machine that can handle basic jobs. Most of those printers are monochrome laser printers, so we focused on those when considering candidates for our main pick.

To start, we scouted for all the current monochrome (black and white) laser printers we could find for under $200. Then we whittled these down to printer-only models (we considered copy/scan models separately), and those with automatic duplex printing, Wi-Fi, and support for mobile printing. We also favored models with cheaper toner costs. To weed out any clunkers that had good specs but poor real-world performance, we read through dozens of customer reviews and editorial reviews.

Plenty of people want a copier and scanner in addition to a printer, so we also sought out a great monochrome multifunction printer.

We set up each printer on both a Windows PC and a Mac, following the manufacturer’s instructions and trying to use Wi-Fi where possible. We considered setup a success once we could print a page from a Web browser and then shut the printer off, turn it back on, and get it to print again. We also tested other connectivity standards, which you can read about in our full guide.

For print-quality testing, we used reference documents that were predominantly text-based, with some elements like columns, tables, or charts.

We also checked out each printer’s quality options, including toner-density sliders and any available print-resolution settings, to see what you can expect with toner-saving options and whether we could eke out better-looking text.

We stress-tested all the paper-feeding parts of each printer, including the main paper trays and document feeders if the printer had one. We (slightly) overstuffed them with paper to see if they’d jam, and we also fed them single sheets to see if they could pick up each. For more on our testing procedures, see our full guide.

Our pick

The Brother HL-L2340DW (pictured) and HL-L2360DW fit onto (or under) most desks. Photo: Kimber Streams

The Brother HL-L2340DW monochrome laser printer is the laser printer that we think will work the best for most people. Toner is a bargain, and it was easier to add to a simple home network than other models like it. All the crucial features you can expect from a decent document printer are here: Wi-Fi, auto duplexing, and support for important mobile printing standards. Text is crisp, and print speed is as fast as you’d ever need in a home office.

Though the L2340DW’s default print quality is worse than that of its closest competitor, the Samsung M2835DW, it’s fine for most home use. If you boost the print-quality setting, the difference mostly vanishes anyway. Even with that downside, we think the L2340DW is the better affordable laser printer overall because it’s easier to set up and troubleshoot, and user reviews suggest that it’s more reliable over a couple of years, too. You probably (probably) won’t ever feel like beating the L2340DW to a pulp Office Space style.

The best thing about the L2340DW is the dirt-cheap cost of ownership. It uses only about 1.7¢ worth of toner per page. Even counting the wear on the drum, the cost works out to about 2.3¢—less than most other residential printers out there. Compared with a similarly low-cost inkjet printer, you’ll save something like $20 per year on document printing even if you print just 500 pages per year. The more you print, the more the math favors the Brother.

Runner-up

The HL-L2360DW is the fraternal-twin Brother (hey-o!) to the HL-L2340DW, and is worth grabbing if it’s cheaper, or if you need an Ethernet port. The L2360DW can print a few extra pages per minute, but both printers are wicked fast for home-use standards, and you probably won’t notice the difference. From what we’ve seen so far, the L2360DW tends to cost a few dollars more than the L2340DW, and isn’t available at as many stores. But again, the differences hardly matter—follow your wallet.

A practical multifunction monochrome printer

The Samsung M2875DW laser printer/scanner/copier is tall, but it has the same footprint as print-only mono laser machines. Photo: Ben Keough

If you want an affordable printer that can also copy and scan, the Samsung Xpress M2875DW mono laser is our favorite option. The cost of operation is low, and this printer is easier to install than most of its competitors. It also has a 50-page auto document feeder, whereas many of its competitors have only a flatbed scanner. The ADF makes copying and scanning multipage documents much easier. The M2875DW also has reliable Wi-Fi connectivity, auto duplex printing, convenient mobile apps, and support for both AirPrint and Google Cloud Print. We think it’s best for home users, but it could work for a small office with modest needs.

This guide may have been updated by The Wirecutter. To see the current recommendation, please go here.

Note from The Wirecutter: When readers choose to buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn affiliate commissions that support our work.

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Facebook F8, Galaxy S8, and Juicero's fate – The Verge

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Facebook F8, Galaxy S8, and Juicero's fate – The Verge

Here we are! Another episode of The Vergecast. It’s been a busy week, which means lots for Nilay, Ashley, Dan, and Paul to talk about on the show. Facebook’s F8 developer conference took place this week so there’s lots of weird updates with AR, social VR, and mind reading. "It’s two sci-fis at once," Paul says.

And of course, the Galaxy S8 has been reviewed! Dan gives us his first-hand impressions, what his favorite features are, and whether he prefers it over the iPhone and the Pixel.

And wow there’s a whole bunch of other stuff we talked about so listen through it all to keep feeding your brain.

01:37 – Juicero offering refunds to all customers after people realize $400 juicer is totally unnecessary

06:34 – Samsung Galaxy S8 review: ahead of the curve

29:25 – Facebook F8 conference 2017

54:23 – Paul’s weekly segment “One day, not so far away, it may be possible for me to think in Mandarin and for you to feel instantly in Spanish

55:39 – Plastc swiped $9 million from backers and just completely vanished

59:35 – Nintendo is reportedly planning to launch a miniature SNES before Christmas

1:00:17 – Intel’s next-generation SSD technology is finally ready and it’s really, really fast

1:00:51 – Slack is adding AIM-style custom status messages

If you enjoyed this podcast and can’t wait for more, we have more stuff you can listen to! We have Ctrl-Walt-Delete with Walt Mossberg and Nilay Patel, which dives deep into tech. We have Verge Extras, which experiments with audio and podcasting in new and interesting ways. You might also want to check out Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher, and Too Embarrassed to Ask hosted by Lauren Goode! You can find them all in iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, and anywhere you get your podcasts nowadays.


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