May 31, 2017

A few years ago, if you were waiting overnight outside an Apple Store ahead of a new product launch, you just might have found Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak sitting next to you on the sidewalk. This wasn’t a marketing stunt by Apple. Wozniak really enjoyed being part of an Apple event with other fans. In an interview with Business Insider, Wozniak compared the night before an Apple release to waiting in line for concert tickets, which he often did when he was younger. Sure, as an Apple co-founder he could have probably pulled strings to get the new iPhone, but he says he’s “just not a favor asker.” Following is a transcript of the video:

Of all the Apple products that had lines — the earlier iPhones, the earlier iPads, yes I always waited in line overnight. Something inspiring in me, something said, “This is a big, important deal.”

I want to be a part of it, just like you want to be a part of a huge festival, you know Coachella maybe. This is going to be an inspiring, great time in my life. That’s how I thought about it, it was just like waiting overnight to get tickets to an important concert.

The earliest I’ve gotten in line for an Apple product is generally, close to 24 hours in advance. Coming by maybe in the morning to noon time and then sitting out all night long till the store opens at whatever 8 in the morning. When I’m waiting in line for products, of course I’m very anxious inside and I feel all the adrenaline flowing.

But I still have to keep up with my email coming in on my computer. Usually I’m sitting in a chair on my computer watching the new Apple product being opened in New Zealand. And then I’m watching it in Australia. Then I’m watching eventually in Tokyo and then London.

And by the time it gets to California 17 hours later, it’s sort of like the whole thing already happened. The glamour of being first already happened.

I don’t really do it anymore. Pretty much just know the products are coming out and they’re not going to be available on day one, especially the version I want. So I just order it online and accept it. I got a lot more patient now.

As an Apple founder I wouldn’t try to get one that way, because before Apple, I had my own philosophical code. I try to be like normal people, do it the same way everyone else does.

Get in line, buy it, pay full price. I’m sure I could probably ask and get some favors, but I’m just not a favor asker. There were times — like the first iPhone, Steve Jobs actually sent me one. And there were other computers he would send me one, but not asked for.

I buy most of the important Apple products because technology is my excitement in life, you know, just like movies and popular culture.

These are all things, oh my gosh I want to be a part of it. Would you miss the next “Star Wars” movie? You know, some people wouldn’t miss it. It’s that deep a part of their life.

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Do you remember Mayim Bialik on “Blossom?” She currently plays Amy Farrah Fowler on “The Big Bang Theory” and is the author of the new book “Girling Up.” The actress, who is also a neuroscientist, explains what’s going on in our brains when we get nostalgic for things like shows we loved as kids — like her popular ’90s sitcom. Following is a transcript of the video:

My name is Mayim Bialik, and I play Amy Farrah Fowler on “The Big Bang Theory.”

I’m often recognized for my role in “Blossom,” the ’90s sitcom where I was playing the lead character from the years that I was 14 to 19.

And there actually is kind of a neuroscience reason why we are nostalgic for things. Obviously our brains store everything we experience as memories. And sometimes we store them consciously, and sometimes they’re stored more unconsciously.

But one of the reasons that we have such a fondness for certain things is that memories are better encoded when they are paired with a very strong emotional response. So if something tragic or sad happens, you will often remember it in a very persistent way, and if something makes you feel good or makes you laugh a lot, which I think maybe people experienced with “Blossom,” you sometimes will get a stronger sense of memory and connection from something that has a positive emotion associated with it.

I should add that sometimes experiences that are negative can be so powerful that you don’t remember them at all. That’s a whole different chemical process.

Depending on where I am, and I guess the age of the person coming up to me, a lot of people tend to know me from “Big Bang Theory.” It’s a show that has tens of millions of people watching it every week, so statistically speaking, many people who also like me on “Blossom” are probably watching “Big Bang Theory.”

But once in a while, I’ll get someone who says “I don’t watch ‘Big Bang Theory,’ but I really loved you on ‘Blossom.'”

Often I’ll get young women, young enough to be my daughter, saying “my mom loved you on ‘Blossom,’ but I’m too young to have seen it, so I love you on ‘Big Bang Theory.'”

That makes me feel old.

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President Trump posted a very strange, incomplete thought on Twitter, and the whole world was confused. The tweet included the nonsensical word “covfefe” which had everyone up all night trying to figure out what it could possibly mean. He eventually deleted it, but the jokes keep pouring in.

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President Trump posted a very strange, incomplete thought on Twitter, and the whole world was confused. The tweet included the nonsensical word “covfefe” which had everyone up all night trying to figure out what it could possibly mean. He eventually deleted it, but the jokes keep pouring in.

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Humans emit roughly 30 to 40 billion tons of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere each year. If we keep it up, Earth will continue to heat up and ultimately devastate our way of life.

So what can we do about it?

Most scientists agree that we need a way to capture some of that CO2 out of the atmosphere. One idea is to plant lots of trees. Trees use CO2 in order to grow. They also release oxygen, so it’s a win-win.

But recent reports indicate that we simply can’t grow enough trees to capture the necessary amount of CO2 that would help us meet the goals set by the Paris Agreement.

In truth, we would have to cover the entire contiguous US with trees just to capture 10% of the CO2 we emit annually.

There’s just not enough room on this planet to have the farmland it takes to feed the world plus the space to plant the necessary number of trees.

In other words, many of us would starve if we tried using trees to solve our emissions problem.

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Brian Greene, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University and co-founder of the World Science Festival, explains one of the most prominent theories of how our universe will meet its fate.

You can learn more fascinating science at this year’s 10th annual World Science Festival in NYC taking place from May 30-June 4. Following is a transcript of the video.

I’m Brian Greene, professor of Physics and Mathematics at Columbia University and co-founder of the World Science Festival.

One of the great discoveries in our era is that not only is the universe expanding — something we’ve known about since 1929 — but it’s speeding up in its expansion.

Everybody thought it would be slowing down because gravity, kind of, pulls things together. But no, it’s speeding up. And it’s even possible that the rate at which it’s speeding up — that might increase over time.

We don’t know yet. These are measurements and theories that are right at the cutting edge of thinking. But if the rate of expansion and rate of acceleration of that expansion does itself increase over time we’re facing a curious future because it would mean that in the far future, the force that would drive everything apart would be so powerful that it would even drive matter to expand.

It would even grab hold of atoms and cause them to expand, cause them to pull apart into their constituent particles. So, everything, in a sense, will be ripped apart by this violent expansion of space. It’s called the Big Rip. Is that in our future?

Nobody knows today.

But measurements are underway to try to see if the accelerated expansion is speeding up. And if it is, that might be the ultimate fate of everything.

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South Korea requires all of its male citizens to serve in the military for two years. Here’s what that experience is like.

Footage courtesy of Goyang TV, 2012

Following is a transcript of the video.

The hardest part was when I and my group had to go into this gas-filled room.

My name is Gene Kim, and I served in the South Korean military for 2 years.

The law requires every male to serve the military, and it is extremely hard to get out of it. If you purposely evade the military duty, you will get jail time.

The service is mandatory mainly because our relationship with North Korea. After things got intensified after the Korean War, there was a need for an active force for the South Koreans, so the military can always be ready.

I served the Korea military between the years of 2009 and 2011. Before the military, I was living in New York. I decided to go because I had to get it over with it at some point.

At the time I did my military service, I hated it.I just hated every moment being in there, trapped in that isolated society. And I just waited for my time to pass.

I haven’t seen a single person who really wanted to be there, who was enthusiastic to be there. People generally want to avoid the military because, I think, of the forcefulness of it. Compared to the US, where the military is voluntary, and you can pursue it as a career, in Korea, 2 years of service is mandatory, and everyone is forced to do it.

You’re living your free life and then suddenly isolated from the rest of the society. You have no contact. You can’t fill your cell-phone addiction there. And you’re basically sacrificing 2 years of your youth for the nation.

So, on the first day when you enter the military. As soon as you enter this training base, you meet these instructors that train you for 5 weeks on from there. They intentionally try to intimidate you, try to scare you, in order to make you into a soldier.

This 5 weeks of training was one of the most intense experiences I had. You’re not even a private at this moment. You are a trainee. The training is very intense. You are yelled at constantly. You don’t have a voice there. You can only do what you’re told to do and nothing else.

You learn to move very fast. When you’re ordered something, you have to run to get it, you have to run to do it. And if you hesitate, you get picked on for that. If you get around 5 minutes of rest, then you’re happy with that. You re-learn things that you thought you already knew. There’s a certain way to eat. There’s a certain way to stand. There’s a certain way to talk to people. There’s a certain way to do everything in the military.

One of the most memorable trainings that I did was this training called “화생방 훈련.” Which is to prepare soldiers to defend against a chemical attack. The hardest part was when I and my group had to go into this gas-filled room.

And you enter the room with your gas mask on, and there’s also an instructor there with a gas mask on. He eventually orders you to put off the gas mask. And when you’re exposed to this gas it doesn’t have long-term effects on you, but anywhere that’s exposed would hurt like hell. It feels like a thousand needles just pinching on to you and grabbing onto you.

And when you inhale this gas, it feels like you’re suffocating. Basically, you can’t breathe. It’s just chaos in that tiny room. Everyone’s grabbing onto each other. Everyone’s rolling on the floor. There was this one guy. He ran to the door trying to get out, but there was a guard there who prevented that. And it was total chaos.

After your 5 weeks of training, you’re relocated to your battalion. So, this is your home from now on. You would stay there for your private to sergeant life. From day one to the end of your service, you hear a lot about North Korea from the officials.

They designate the North Korean military as our enemy. This was the first time when I learned that North Korea has invaded South Korea even after the truce multiple times.

I don’t know if it’s because I’ve been brainwashed, but now I’m convinced that they have the capability and will to do a lot of damage to the Korean Society. There’s always a potential that the North Koreans can Invade us and the military’s trying to prepare for that.

Looking back at the experience, I think I gained a few things. There’s a saying in the military, “If you can’t make it work, make it work.” I learned that if you really put your will and just do it, then I can really achieve…I feel like I can achieve anything.

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“Wonder Woman” is the fourth installment in DC’s Extended Universe, and the first female superhero movie since Jennifer Garner starred in “Elektra” in 2006. Director Patty Jenkins explains what the biggest challenge she faced was in bringing the hero to life on the big screen. Following is a transcript of the video:

Longevity of focus, I think, is the hardest part. You know it’s to have a vision and then try to hold that vision and not have it change.

The hardest part was literally getting it to the start line and a commitment to make it happen even though you know it was a low burn over a long period of time. But you know longevity of focus is I think the hardest part. You know it’s to have a vision and then try to hold that vision and not have it change when a million elements around it change every day. So what a shot turned out like or what the thing turned out like or how the story changes subtly it’s like still trying to hold to the center.

I put it on myself before anybody else even had to because I am also a fan, I also appreciate the genre and it’s a once of a lifetime chance for her to have her first movie. So I care a lot about making the greatest thing I can anyway. This is — there’s an added layer of responsibility. I did feel I was a perfectly good person to be the one to try and so from there I just gave everything that I had to trying to never drop the ball and make sure it really lived up to everything that I could. So, you know, it was pressure I could deal with and it actually was an amazingly fun experience because I love my cast and I love the story we are telling and we laughed all day long but it doesn’t mean I never stopped waking up everyday and saying like, “Anything I can do —I’ll do to make this better.”

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During the mid 20th century, physicists were grappling with a perplexing puzzle. It seemed that every time they applied equations to explain fundamental properties we see and experience around us — like the mass of a particle or what happens when two particles interact with each other — they always got the same answer: infinity.

But this wasn’t a result at all. It was mathematics’ way of telling them that they were doing something wrong. Here, professor of physics and mathematics at Columbia University and co-founder of the World Science Festival, Brian Greene, reveals the story of how physicists ultimately tackled the puzzle of infinity.

You can learn more fascinating science at this year’s 10th annual World Science Festival in NYC taking place from May 30-June 4. Following is a transcript of the video:

Infinity is a way that nature, kind of, grabs you by the lapel and slaps you in the face and says, “You were doing something that doesn’t make any sense.”

So, one of the big problems that afflicted quantum mechanics is that when scientists started to do calculations with the structure, they found an answer that would pop out of the mathematics and did not make any sense.

The answer was infinity.

Almost any question that you asked, if you did the calculations, you know, “How does at a mass of a particle change?”,“How do these two particles slam into each other?”

The answer was infinite.

And infinite doesn’t mean big. So people realized that we had to find a way to deal with these infinities. Kind of get rid of them. During, I guess, it was the ’50s and ’60s, a group of scientists came up with a way of thinking about it, to got rid of the infinities.

And in essence, what they found is we were taking our equations a little too seriously.

We were pushing our equations to arbitrarily short distances. Arbitrarily high energy, where they, probably, don’t actually apply.

So what people realized is that if you cut off the equations, be more modest in how you apply them you can naturally get rid of the infinities and, in a way, still have a predictive theory.

So this is the subject of normalization in quantum field theory and that was a breakthrough that allowed us get things like the Standard Model of particle physics, which predicted the Higgs bosom that was discovered in 2012, by the Large Hadron Collider.

This is a structure, a mathematical structure that can make predictions for the properties of particles that agrees with observations to ten decimal places.

So this is, in many ways, the shining wonder of theoretical physics and without normalization, getting rid of the infinities — the structure would not fly.

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Many people believe that the white gunk on cooked salmon is fat. However, it’s actually a soluble protein called albumin that is also in egg whites. Having too much of it on your salmon could mean that it’s overcooked. You can easily minimize it by soaking your fish in a brine solution for 10 minutes prior to cooking.

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